Taking Cherries and VitaCherry® HiActives® For Gout

Gout is extremely painful. The swelling, the stiffness, the intense discomfort – it can all last for days. And the more gout attacks you have, the higher your risk of developing them again and again.

So anybody who has experienced gout or even is at risk for gout should be doing everything in their power to keep gout flare-ups away for good.

Taking Cherries and VitaCherry® HiActives® For Gout

Fortunately, there are quite a few choices available:

  • Doctors can prescribe medications that help lower the buildup of uric acid responsible for the gout
  • Eating fewer purines (found mostly in seafood and meat) can greatly reduce the amount of uric acid in the body
  • Working out and losing weight also plays an important role in keeping gout away

But there is one tasty option that you may never have considered before to treat and prevent gout: cherries.

Yes, those tasty sweet or tart little fruits have the power to change your gout game for the better. But how and why does this happen?

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Below you will find everything you need to know about cherries and gout attacks – why they help, the studies that back it all up, and how to get more of them into your diet easily.

How Cherries Help Gout

Cherries are really healthy little fruits.

They are high in vitamin A, vitamin C, and potassium – they even have protein and iron. Cherries also have natural melatonin, which helps you regulate your sleep/awake cycles better. And studies have shown they have the power to do everything from reduce stroke risk to help you lose weight.

Plus, cherries are an incredible source of antioxidants. Anthocyanins are a powerful anti-inflammatory type of antioxidant found in cherries – in fact, cherries are just about the richest sources of anthocyanins available.

But what does this all have to do with gout pain and inflammation? Experts are learning that cherries help gout in two main ways – they reduce both uric acid and inflammation. This is why that combo’s important:

In a gout attack, a buildup of the waste product uric acid creates something called urate crystals. These urate crystals travel to a joint – normally your big toe, but it could be others too – and you get some serious inflammation which causes that hallmark gout pain and swelling.

So when you help your body reduce uric acid and you reduce the inflammation, you have yourself an incredible gout support fruit.

And scientific studies back up this whole idea…

Scientific Studies On Cherries and Gout

It’s essential to actually look at the scientific studies. All of this information on cherries can sound good, but you want to know that it will actually help you with the excruciating pain of gout. Here are two studies to give you a good idea.

Study on cherries and gout #1

One study looked at 633 people who have gout. Researchers followed each participant for one year. Throughout that year, each gout attack was recorded: what date it popped up, what symptoms they had, what signs came first, what medications they used, and what risk factors led up to the episode for 2 days prior to the gout attack.

Those who consumed cherry extract had a 35% less chance of gout attacks compared to those who did not consume cherry.

In fact, no matter any other risk factors they might have had – like weight, alcohol consumption, purine intake, or medications – those who took the cherry still had the same success rate. This study reconfirmed the ability of cherries to lesson both uric acid and inflammation.

(As a side note, the researchers found that those who combined cherry extract with anti-gout medication actually had a 75% less chance of developing a gout attack than someone who did nothing to prevent their attacks.)

Study on cherries and gout #2

Another study looked at 10 healthy women between the ages of 22 and 40. Each had two servings (an equivalent of 280 grams) of cherries after they fasted overnight. The researchers took both blood and urine samples before the cherries were eaten and afterwards.

The results mostly had to do with urate, which is a salt made from uric acid and the culprit of your gout attacks.

Urate in the blood decreased after eating the cherries and urate in the urine increased after eating the cherries which means one thing – all that excess uric acid was leaving the body/blood and heading out the urinary system. This is exactly what any gout sufferer needs!

Both of these studies confirm that eating cherries is not just an old wives’ tale, but an actual medical step you can take to both treat and prevent your gout symptoms.

RELATED: 3 Critical Foods To Avoid for Gout 

How To Get More Tart Cherry When You Have Gout

How To Get More Tart Cherry When You Have Gout

Now there’s no doubt about it – anybody who suffers from gout, is in the midst of a gout attack right now, or has risk factors for gout, should be bumping up their cherry consumption.

So how do you start consuming all this cherry goodness? Well, there are really two main options available to you:

1. Cherry Extract or VitaCherry® HiActives®

One of the best and easiest ways to get the benefits of tart cherries is to eat them in a concentrated supplement. This allows you to get all those antioxidants and anti-inflammatories:

  • Quickly – One swallow a day, and you’re done
  • Powerfully – You are going to get a larger punch of those antioxidants through a concentrated supplement than you will eating a handful of cherries
  • With less sugar – Cherries are good for you, but too much of a good thing is still too much. The supplement helps you monitor your sugar content.

The best way to benefit from a cherry extract is to choose high quality VitaCherry® HiActives® combined with these other essential all-natural supplements for gout support:

  • Celery Seed Extract: The seeds of celery can greatly reduce inflammation and the pain associated with inflammation
  • Chanca Piedra Extract: Not only does this herb help reduce inflammation, it can also help prevent a kidney stone from your buildup of uric acid
  • Hydrangea Extract: This traditional medicinal helps waste products exit the body, lowers inflammation, and improves joint pain

When you combine these with the cherry supplement, you are allowing the full power of all-natural medicine to keep your gout attacks away. And Eu Natural’s G-Out does just that.

2. Eat Cherries

This second option is really simple: eat more cherries. Can them, cook them, bake them, freeze them and drop them in a smoothie – you can’t go wrong. If you have absolutely no idea what to do with cherries other than snack on them, here are a few recipes to get you started. Since you will probably be cutting out extra meat to limit your purines, all of these recipes are vegetarian:

Here’s a video on cherry chia overnight oats, which makes a great breakfast:

And here’s one more on vegan energy bars with a cherry drizzle, which make a great snack for on the go:

As you can see, you can basically incorporate cherries into anything you want – especially breakfast foods, snacks, and salads.

Don’t forget to make some of these recipes part of your weekly menus. It’s easy to remember to eat cherries when you are having a gout attack or just recovering from one – but it’s super important to keep the power of cherries going continually to ward of another gout attack.

Pro tip: While cherry juice could technically help too, it shouldn’t be your go-to choice. Juice is normally really high in sugar without any good fiber to balance it out. And when it’s from concentrate, you’re not guaranteed that all those powerful anthocyanins are in there. Also avoid cherry pie filling or syrup.

Stick with the cherry supplement or the actual fruit.

Are There Any Side Effects?

Overall, cherries are considered safe for most adults who do not have a cherry allergy.

If you are taking a cherry supplement like VitaCherry® HiActives®, you need to follow the prescribed dosage. There should be no problems at that level. Don’t give cherry extract to a child without first consulting their pediatrician.

Cherries are really good for you – so eating 1 to 3 servings shouldn’t cause a problem. But there is no need to go overboard. Too many calories, carbs, sugar, and fiber is actually possible. One of the successful studies we mentioned had the women eat two servings, so aim for that!

Of course, if you show any sign of a food allergy reaction when you eat these cherries, you should stop taking them immediately and talk to your doctor.

Pregnant and breastfeeding women should be fine consuming both sweet and tart cherries at normal food amounts. Larger medicinal amounts of cherries (like the kind in supplements) have not yet been tested, so you may want to avoid them until your baby is born and weaned.

Using Cherries To Manage Your Gout

As you can see, getting plenty of cherries is a really effective choice for those suffering from gout attacks. It’s always a great thing when something fully natural without side effects can give your body the help it needs.

For ultimate gout prevention and treatment, combine this “food medicine” with a healthier diet (low in purines and alcohol!) and plenty of regular exercise. It’s also important to visit your doctor regularly to discuss if prescription medication is necessary. These steps can help you get ahead of gout inflammation and stop it in its tracks.

Read Next: 9 Natural Herbal Remedies for Gout That Crush Your Flare-Ups Fast 

 

Sources:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1756464614002886
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/803289
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3510330/
http://jn.nutrition.org/content/133/6/1826.short
https://www.joyfulhealthyeats.com/fresh-cherry-crisp-recipe/
https://minimalistbaker.com/cherry-limeade-smoothie/
http://www.futureceuticals.com/products/vitacherry®
https://www.livestrong.com/article/464275-what-does-eating-too-many-cherries-cause/
https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-771-sour%20cherry.aspx?activeingredientid=771&activeingredientname=sour%20cherry
https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/08/02/health-benefits-cherries.aspx